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International/National

The Guardian (UK)

Dogs in therapy

Daily Mail

The oldest crystal on Earth

ABC News

Secret of how peacocks shake their tail feathers

UPI

Nations negotiate fishing in Arctic high seas

Vice

Indigenous artists and thinkers on relocating

Yahoo Finance

Basic income poses threat to existing social programs

CBC News

RESP grants favour higher-income families

CBC News

Pigging out on Facebook and Twitter

Globe and Mail

Pine beetles not responsible for wildfires

Politico

What can one photo tell us about the media and 2016?

Across Canada

Toronto Star

Just 60 seconds of intense exercise can boost your fitness level

Local News

Vancouver Sun

Online Vancouver ads seek sex in exchange for accommodation

Metro News

Antibiotics overuse can accelerate Type 1 diabetes

News 1130

Political price for education cut showdowns across B.C.

News 1130

Cécile McLorin Salvant at UBC this weekend

 

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Dogs in therapy
The Guardian (UK)

More media outlets reported on an informal survey of dog behaviour by UBC canine expert Stanley Coren. In a blog post for Psychology Today, Coren said a hug could restrict a dog’s ability to move and therefore stress out the animal.

Coren examined photos of people hugging their dogs online and found that eight out of every 10 photos suggested that the dogs were anxious or uncomfortable with being hugged.

The story appeared in the Guardian (UK), TIME, Boston Globe, CBC News, Ottawa Citizen and Vancouver Sun.

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The oldest crystal on Earth
Daily Mail

The oldest pieces of rock on Earth – zircon crystals – were probably formed in the craters left by asteroids and not created by Earth’s plate tectonics, reports the Daily Mail.

Mark Jellinek, a professor in the earth, ocean and atmospheric sciences at UBC, was quoted in the story. According to Jellinek, events early in Earth’s history influenced the development of the planet’s magnetic field, plate tectonics and climate.

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Secret of how peacocks shake their tail feathers
ABC News

A team led by UBC’s Roslyn Dakin has found that peacocks vibrate their feathers around 25 beats per second on average to generate a low-frequency sound that peahens can hear as part of a mating dance.

The study was featured on ABC (Australia), Gizmodo and other media outlets.

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Nations negotiate fishing in Arctic high seas
UPI

United Press International cited research by UBC’s Daniel Pauly which showed that China’s long-distance catch is vastly under-reported. Pauly and colleagues estimated that the country’s catch may have been as much as 4.6 million tonnes per year from 2000-11, not 368,000 tonnes per year as reported.

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Indigenous artists and thinkers on relocating
Vice

UBC professor Daniel Heath Justice was one of several indigenous thinkers included in a Vice article criticising calls for indigenous people to relocate.

“Always, we have generally white men who claim to know better for us than we do…Ultimately, their presumption is they know best for everybody. No matter what the rest of us think, they have the answers and by god we’re going to listen and if we don’t listen then they say we’re ungrateful, we’re naive, we’re ignorant, we’re backwards, we’re primitive,” said Justice.

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Basic income poses threat to existing social programs
Yahoo Finance

UBC economist Kevin Milligan was cited in a Yahoo Finance article on Ontario’s plans for a basic income pilot program.

“My concern is the sales pitch for basic income is often predicated on simplifying the administration of social supports and having a simple, transparent and clear benefit. But, if you’re keeping the existing supports and then just throw a basic income on top of that, you’re not really solving the problems a Basic Income Program purportedly solves,” Milligan said.

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RESP grants favour higher-income families
CBC News

A study of the Canada Education Savings Program shows that it’s helping higher-income families much more than struggling households, reports CBC News.

The findings support UBC economist Kevin Milligan’s position, according to the article. In 2002 and 2008, Milligan said that the grants disproportionately benefit high-income families that are 3½ times more likely to have an RESP than low-income families.

Similar articles appeared on Yahoo and MSN.

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Pigging out on Facebook and Twitter
CBC News

A CBC article on social media excesses quotes Peter Reiner, professor at the National Core for Neuroethics. According to Reiner, research by the U.S. Federal Reserve found that worker productivity after computers were introduced continued to rise, until social media appeared.

“It has been flat since social media became so popular, and they attribute it directly to social media,” Reiner said.

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Pine beetles not responsible for wildfires
Globe and Mail

A U.S. study showing that the beetle infestations in the U.S. Pacific Northwest are not as much of a fire hazard as previously feared may not be directly applicable to B.C., according to UBC forest fire expert Lori Daniels.

Daniels told the Globe and Mail that the pine-beetle epidemic that hit B.C. in the 1990s mainly affects lodgepole pine and was more severe in the province than in Washington and Oregon, where there’s a varied mix of tree species.

“In parts of our province, it was almost pure lodgepole pine that was being affected…which means there wasn’t a large amount of residual green trees [left alive],” Daniels said. “So that’s quite a different scenario than a mixed conifer forest where only a portion of the stand was affected.”

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What can one photo tell us about the media and 2016?
Politico

Policy site Politico asked and critics to analyze an image taken after the March 10 GOP debate in Miami for what it says about media in 2016.

UBC professor Heidi Tworek, who studies the history of news, said the photo shows how Donald Trump, surrounded by media, has become part of journalists’ index. Indexing is the idea that political coverage closely tracks debates among politicians because reporters depend on politicians as sources.

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Just 60 seconds of intense exercise can boost your fitness level
Toronto Star

UBC Okanagan health and exercise science professor Jonathan Little praised a new study that shows even a minute of intense exercise raises your fitness level.

“No studies before have really looked at this very low time-efficient strategy for anything longer than six weeks,” said Little in an interview with Toronto Star.

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Online Vancouver ads seek sex in exchange for accommodation
Vancouver Sun

The growing number of online ads in Vancouver offering accommodation in exchange for sex was the focus of a Vancouver Sun article.

“[The ads are] taking advantage of the fact that this is a terrible market in which to find reasonably priced living space — it’s very low vacancy rates and very high rents,” said UBC law professor Janine Benedet.

“New criminal laws make it illegal to pay for sex. It’s a way of paying for sex,” said Benedet.

A similar story appeared in The Province and Saskatoon Star Phoenix.

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Antibiotics overuse can accelerate Type 1 diabetes
Metro News

A new UBC study shows that prolonged antibiotic use can accelerate Type 1 diabetes by disrupting gut bacteria, reports Vancouver Metro News.

“This suggests that early life events are critical to health,” said senior author and UBC Okanagan researcher Deanna Gibson. “Our research pinpoints the significant role of bacteria and how antibiotic use can alter their normal development in the gut which then can alter the health of these individuals.”

Similar articles appeared on Kelowna Now, Kelowna Capital News and Castanet.

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Political price for education cut showdowns across B.C.
News 1130

Jason Ellis, a UBC professor of education, was cited in a News 1130 article on education cuts across B.C.

“This is one of the things about BC education finance that is different than it used to be,” said Ellis. “When school trustees set the rates and raised the rates themselves, then they had to answer at the ballot box when taxes went up. But they no longer set the tax rates. The finances are in the government’s hands so they have to make those decisions and they may feel the fallout from them.”

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Cécile McLorin Salvant at UBC this weekend
News 1130

Award winning jazz artist Cécile McLorin Salvant will perform on Sunday at the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts at UBC, reports News 1130.

Wendy Atkinson with the Chan Centre says the program will include new versions of old songs.

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Event Highlight

Chan Centre Presents Cécile McLorin Salvant

Time: Sunday, May 1, 7 p.m.

Location: Chan Shun Concert Hall, Chan Centre

Find out what else is happening at UBC: www.events.ubc.ca


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