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International/National

Financial Times

Book review: Environmentalism of the Rich

Men's Journal

Marijuana can help battle depression, anxiety, PTSD, and addiction

CBC

Maybe robots aren’t the enemy, as jobs and economy surge

Globe and Mail

The domino effect: What happens if millennials never buy houses

Local News

Global

Alberta police watchdog spurs calls for better justice funding

Vancouver Sun

Legal challenges won’t stop Kinder Morgan from moving ahead

Vancouver Sun

100+ events to get you into the holiday spirit

Business in Vancouver

Climate change commitments not in the pipeline for Canada

Roundhouse Radio

UBC mathematician talks about Order of Canada

Roundhouse Radio

Donald Trump’s vision for NASA

Roundhouse Radio

UBC professor talks about pipeline expansion approval

Roundhouse Radio

The concept of soft architecture

Castanet

Our resilient Okanagan

UBC Alumni

CTV

Solar systems created at Vancouver’s first VR lounge

 

The UBC Daily Media Summary is compiled by UBC Public Affairs. Sign up for other Public Affairs e-mail services at http://news.ubc.ca/media-resources/digital-subscriptions/.

 
 
Book review: Environmentalism of the Rich
Financial Times

Financial Times reviewed a book called Environmentalism of the Rich, written by Paul Dauvergne, a UBC professor of international relations.

Dauvergne stresses that he is not opposed in principle to corporate social responsibility, eco-consumerism or partnerships between companies and campaign groups. He writes that these initiatives are positive but not enough to address the global ecological crisis.

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Marijuana can help battle depression, anxiety, PTSD, and addiction
Men's Journal

Men’s Journal featured UBC research that found medical cannabis can play a role in treating mental illness, including addiction.

“There is so little guidance in this area, which inspired us to do this work,” said lead study author Zach Walsh, a psychology professor at UBC’s Okanagan campus. “I get so many calls from colleagues asking what to tell patients who use cannabis to help deal with an alcohol dependency or depression or a bad back.”

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Maybe robots aren’t the enemy, as jobs and economy surge
CBC

CBC quoted Adam Saunders, a UBC Sauder School of Business professor, after new data shows unemployment is decreasing in Canada despite claims technology is supposed to make more jobs obsolete.

Saunder, who researches the connection between technology and economics, said technology is both creating and destroying work. He highlighted an example from the movie Up in the Air when George Clooney’s character travels telling people they have lost their jobs.

“There’s no reason why a computer couldn’t do that,” Saunders said. “But there are things that human beings, in terms of empathy, for example, can do much better.”

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The domino effect: What happens if millennials never buy houses
Globe and Mail

The Globe and Mail mentioned an interview with Paul Kershaw, a professor at UBC’s school of population and public health, for a column about the impact of fewer millennials becoming home owners.

Kershaw said decreasing purchases by young buyers could negatively affect home prices in general.

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Alberta police watchdog spurs calls for better justice funding
Global

Global quoted Benjamin Perrin, a UBC law professor, in a story about the future collaboration between Alberta’s police watchdog and the Crown’s office.

After a communication issue contributed to a violent criminal case being thrown out over unreasonable delays, the two parties said they are working together to “help avoid unnecessary delays in the future.”

“[The report card found] Alberta has problems with criminal justice efficiency,” Perrin wrote in an email to Global. “The percentage of charges stayed or withdrawn in Alberta (for various reasons) was high at 35.3 percent on average and the average criminal case length was also greater than many other provinces at 183 days.”

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Legal challenges won’t stop Kinder Morgan from moving ahead
Vancouver Sun

Gordon Christie, UBC’s Indigenous legal studies director, spoke to the Vancouver Sun about how court challenges by First Nations could slow down Kinder Morgan’s $6.8-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion down but will likely not thwart the project.

“It could slow things down – that’s really the extent of it,” Christie said of the First Nation legal challenges. “The kinds of arguments they are making, they don’t have, at this point, what counts as a veto.”

The story also appeared in the Montreal Gazette.

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100+ events to get you into the holiday spirit
Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun featured several holiday events on UBC campus including the Balloon Winter Wonderland and Holiday Craft Fair in Wesbrook Village and J.S. Bach’s Magnificat at UBC’s Chan Centre.

The story also appeared in The Province.

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Climate change commitments not in the pipeline for Canada
Business in Vancouver

Kathryn Harrison, a UBC political science professor, was quoted in Business in Vancouver after she addressed the Ministerial Panel on the Trans Mountain Expansion Project.

“To embrace the economic viability of this project is to self-consciously make an economic bet on a world of catastrophic climate change that the Government of Canada itself has explicitly committed to avoid,” she said.

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UBC mathematician talks about Order of Canada
Roundhouse Radio

Nassif Ghoussoub, a UBC mathematics professor, was interviewed on Roundhouse Radio after he was recently honoured with the Order of Canada.

“We really have to try to do more than just our own research and teaching work, which is really what drove me in building institutions, to support the community at large and to put Canada on the map,” he said. “To put the West Coast of Canada on the map nationally, and internationally, which is what we did with the Banff International Research Station.”

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Donald Trump’s vision for NASA
Roundhouse Radio

Roundhouse Radio interviewed Jaymie Matthews, a UBC physics and astronomy professor, about the implications of Donald Trump’s vow to cut climate change research by NASA.

“We have this amazing vantage point to study the earth as a global system in ways that we could never do if we were stuck on the ground or even with aircraft. And Trump’s suggestion that NASA and other space agencies should just be looking outward and not inward towards the earth, is like suggesting that if you’re on a rescue mission to find lost hikers or a downed aircraft in the ocean that you should only look from the ground,” he said.

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UBC professor talks about pipeline expansion approval
Roundhouse Radio

George Hoberg, a professor at UBC’s Liu Institute for Global Issues, was interviewed on Roundhouse Radio about the pipeline expansion approval.

“The good part of it is that they’re trying to construct a political coalition that allows them to move forward with an effective climate plan. What I worry about is they have this belief that in order to finance the climate plan and get political support from Alberta, they need to keep approving big fossil fuel projects,” he said.

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The concept of soft architecture
Roundhouse Radio

Joe Dahmen, a professor at UBC’s school of architecture and landscape architecture, discussed the concept of soft architecture on Roundhouse Radio.

He explained how traditional development drains natural resources.

“Because architecture is engaged so intricately with energy and materials, it means it can be a huge part of the solution to minimizing our footprint and actually engaging in a positive way with the ecosystems,” he said. “In a way, you can look at what we’ve been doing as running on a kind of geological subsidy of concentrations of energy, and as we move toward a kind of new paradigm, I think we have tremendous capability to reshape that narrative.”

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Our resilient Okanagan
Castanet

Castanet highlighted an open discussion hosted by UBC’s Okanagan Institute for Biodiversity, Resilience, and Ecosystem Services and Institute for Community Engaged Research.

Resilience is the theme of the forum, which will include presentations and discussions by expert panelists discussing how the concept of resilience applies to social, cultural and ecological systems.

The event takes place at the Kelowna Yacht Club from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a keynote lecture at 6:30 p.m.

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Solar systems created at Vancouver’s first VR lounge
CTV

Alex Chua and Charlie Shi, two UBC Sauder School of Business alumni, were featured on CTV Vancouver after they launched Metro Vancouver’s first virtual reality lounge.

“We’re not an arcade,” Chua said. “An arcade is like, you have money, you go play. We want to be there for the customer through every aspect of their journey, from the second you step in the door to the second you step out.”

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Event Highlight

David Feherty – Live Off Tour

Time: Thursday December 15, 2016 8:00 p.m.

Location: Chan Shun Concert Hall

Find out what else is happening at UBC: www.events.ubc.ca


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