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International/National

BBC News

Vancouver’s ‘freak show’ property market

Bloomberg Markets

Note to Swiss: Basic income plans have a basic flaw

Globe and Mail

Ottawa moves on with Site C dam amid academic opposition

The Conversation

Getting medical information from Wikipedia isn’t always bad

Op/Ed

National Post

Most B.C. residents think their government is an oligarchy

Vancouver Sun

Base cannabis use warnings on scientific evidence

Across Canada

CBC News

Fort McMurray smoke impedes soccer association

Local News

CBC News

Mother-son Indigenous duo to graduate UBC together

CBC News

Breaking down the Brexit vote

CBC News

Lucky $888,888 price tag targets Chinese home buyers

CTV News

Vancouver housing crisis ‘Code Red’ for young people

Vancouver Sun

UBC health research gains $27 million from province

Metro News

Lawyers launch free women’s legal clinic in B.C.

Kelowna Capital News

Workshop tackles climate change skepticism

UBC Alumni

Business in Vancouver

Chris Catliff BlueShore Financial president & CEO

Times Colonist

Two more Island athletes bound for Rio

 

The UBC Daily Media Summary is compiled by UBC Public Affairs. Sign up for other Public Affairs e-mail services at http://news.ubc.ca/media-resources/digital-subscriptions/.

 
 
Vancouver’s ‘freak show’ property market
BBC News

BBC News interviewed UBC geographer David Ley and UBC economist Thomas Davidoff for a radio story on the unaffordable nature of Vancouver’s real estate market.

Ley spoke about the influence of Chinese money on places like Vancouver. Davidoff discussed how a shift in taxes could contribute to a more vibrant economy.

Ley’s segment begins at 06:48 and Davidoff’s starts at 15:37.

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Note to Swiss: Basic income plans have a basic flaw
Bloomberg Markets

An article on Bloomberg Markets highlights research by UBC economist Kevin Milligan in advance of the upcoming Swiss vote on universal basic income.

Milligan found that it’s unlikely any basic income initiative will accomplish all of its professed goals and any plan will require trade-offs. His “impossible trinity” model, including a phase-out rate, the size of the payout, and the overall cost of income assistance programs, are are all desirable factors but can’t happen at the same time.

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Ottawa moves on with Site C dam amid academic opposition
Globe and Mail

An article in the Globe and Mail focuses on two UBC professors who urged Ottawa to revisit the cabinet order approving the Site C dam project.

Karen Bakker holds a Canada research chair in water governance at UBC, and Gordon Christie is an indigenous legal studies professor.

Bakker called the potential environmental effects from Site C “unprecedented in the history of environmental assessment in Canada” while Christie said the Liberal response to this project will be a test of the government’s approach to First Nations.

A similar story appeared on Desmog Canada and Canadian Manufacturing.

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Getting medical information from Wikipedia isn’t always bad
The Conversation

An article on The Conversation about the changing attitudes towards using Wikipedia for medical information was co-authored by UBC emergency medicine professor James Heilman.

“The Wikiversity Journal of Medicine follows standard international best-practice guidelines for medical journals, drawing from such reputable bodies as the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors,” the authors wrote.

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Most B.C. residents think their government is an oligarchy
National Post

UBC political scientist Maxwell A. Cameron wrote an op-ed for the National Post about a recent poll showing British Columbians believe elections can be bought and why he says this needs to change.

“According to an Insights West poll, 90 per cent of British Columbians think corporations are influential in shaping public policy, and roughly half think they are the most influential group in politics,” Cameron wrote.

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Base cannabis use warnings on scientific evidence
Vancouver Sun

A letter from UBC’s Stephanie Lake of the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS and UBC medicine professor M-J Milloy was published in the Vancouver Sun in response to an op-ed that said adolescent cannabis use increases the risk of developing schizophrenia.

“After intense study, scientists have concluded the evidence to date does not support the claim that cannabis causes schizophrenia,” the letter said.

The article also appeared in the Ottawa Citizen.

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Fort McMurray smoke impedes soccer association
CBC News

An article on CBC News about the cancellation of minor sports in For McMurray includes an interview with UBC atmospheric science professor Douw Steyn.

“The fine particles are ash and soot from the fire. The ash and soot also contains incompletely burned oil, particularly conifers have a large amount of oil in them and these partially burned oils can actually be quite toxic,” Steyn said.

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Mother-son Indigenous duo to graduate UBC together
CBC News

CBC News reported on mother-son duo Randy and Jocelyne Robinson who will both graduate from UBC this week.

Randy will graduate with a law degree and Jocelyne will graduate with a PhD in education. Both are Algonquin from the Timiskaming First Nation in Quebec.

The pair intend to use their degrees to address the First Nations’ inequities that contributed to their decisions to return to pursue a higher education.

Similar stories also appeared on CKNW and CBC Radio Canada.

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Breaking down the Brexit vote
CBC News

Yves Tiberghien, the director of the Institute of Asian Research at UBC did an interview for the Early Edition on CBC News regarding the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom.

“Deep down it’s an issue of identity for the British at this moment. But I think there’s a growing awareness that the gains of leaving are not that great right, they’re symbolic whereas the loss of leaving are big, are real,” he said.

The segment begins at 02:18:12.

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Lucky $888,888 price tag targets Chinese home buyers
CBC News

A CBC News article on the trend of targeting Chinese homebuyers using the lucky number eight includes research from UBC economics professor Nicole Fortin.

In a 2012 study, Fortin calculated that Vancouver addresses ending in the number eight sold at a 2.5 per cent premium. A house in Victoria hit the market with a price tag of $888,888.

The story also appeared on Yahoo Finance.

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Vancouver housing crisis ‘Code Red’ for young people
CTV News

CTV News reported on a video campaign by Paul Kershaw a professor at UBC’s school of population and public health.

The “Code Red” campaign by the campaign Generation Squeeze features videos showing a family putting beds for kids in a cabinet, under a desk and in a couch and another woman offering rent to “students” in kitchen cupboards.

“These are massive deteriorations in the standard of living,” Kershaw told CTV News. “We need to take this seriously. It’s urgent, like there’s a code red problem in a hospital.”

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UBC health research gains $27 million from province
Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun reported on a $27 million grant that will go towards studies on childhood diabetes, genome sequencing, cancer treatment and brain imaging among others at UBC.

Funds from the B.C. Knowledge and Development Fund will go towards developing laboratories and buying equipment for 40 research projects concentrated mostly in health care.

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Lawyers launch free women’s legal clinic in B.C.
Metro News

Metro News reported on the Rise Women’s Legal Centre, a free legal clinic that is a partnership between UBC’s Allard School of Law and West Coast Legal Education and Action Fund.

The centre is the first of its kind in B.C. since the province cut back legal aid funding by 40 per cent in 2002.

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Workshop tackles climate change skepticism
Kelowna Capital News

Kelowna Capital News reported on a workshop and panel discussion on climate change skeptics hosted by UBCO sustainability professor Greg Garrad.

Garrard is hosting the event along with the UBCO faculty of creative and critical studies sustainability.

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Chris Catliff BlueShore Financial president & CEO
Business in Vancouver

Business in Vancouver profiled UBC alumnus Chris Catliff, now the CEO of credit union Blueshore Financial.

He has also served as president of Vancity Enterprises and president and CEO at North Shore Credit Union.

Catliff received both his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees from UBC.

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Two more Island athletes bound for Rio
Times Colonist

Beach volleyball player Jamie Broder, a former UBC Thunderbird, was featured in the Times Colonist as one of the athletes most likely to represent Canada at the Rio Olympics.

The team is so confident in Broder that she was one of the athletes chosen by the Canadian Olympic Committee to model the Rio 2016 uniforms when they were unveiled in April.

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Event Highlight

Pulp and Paper Centre 30th Anniversary Open House

Time: Saturday, May 28, 2016 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Location: Pulp and Paper Centre 2385 East Mall

Find out what else is happening at UBC: www.events.ubc.ca


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