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International/National

CBC News

Humpback whale losing ‘threatened’ status amid Northern Gateway concerns

Dallas News

Does living in a city make you unhappy?

Alaska Highway News

Mothers to have more options for birth soon – hopefully

Religion News Service

New book exhorts atheists to ‘come out’ of the closet

CBC The National

Generation Squeezed

CBC The National

More details about the man accused of exploiting B.C. teen online

Globe and Mail

Cheating said to be on rise in North American B-schools

Globe and Mail

Bringing students into the grading process with new software

National Post

Smart cars an easy target for the not-so-smart

National Post

What if we stopped loving hockey?

Op/Ed

Globe and Mail

MacLeod was an inquisitive, quiet, fatherly figure

Toronto Star

Harper’s tough choice on new fighter jet for Canada

Vancouver Sun

Demystifying university admissions

Local News

Global BC

Canada lacks national autism strategy: UBC professor

Vancouver Sun

Malaria’s huge human cost

Vancouver Sun

‘If we know what to do, why are they dying?’

Province

As TV turns 75, is best to come?

Province

Save your life, not just some time

Province

Seriously stressed-out students on the rise

Tyee

Are climate claims for burning renewable trees a smokescreen?

Kelowna Daily Courier

A global focus on safety and security

 

The UBC Daily Media Summary is compiled by UBC Public Affairs. Sign up for other Public Affairs e-mail services at http://news.ubc.ca/media-resources/digital-subscriptions/.

 
 
Humpback whale losing ‘threatened’ status amid Northern Gateway concerns
CBC News

The federal government is downgrading Canadian humpback whales from “threatened” to “species of special concern,” with some saying the move will ease the approval process for the Northern Gateway pipeline.

But a UBC professor says this is good news for the mammal.

“We’re seeing more humpback whales in B.C. than we’ve ever seen before,” said Andrew Trites, director of UBC’s Marine Mammal Research Unit.

A similar story appeared in Vancouver Sun.

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Does living in a city make you unhappy?
Dallas News

Lafayette, Louisiana is the happiest place in the United States, according to a report co-authored by UBC economics professor Joshua Gottlieb.

The report found people living in so-called “declining cities” were the unhappiest.

“Desires for happiness and life satisfaction do not uniquely drive human ambitions,” the report reads. “Residents of unhappier metropolitan areas today do receive higher wages presumably as compensation for their misery.”

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Mothers to have more options for birth soon – hopefully
Alaska Highway News

The lack of midwives in northern British Columbia is examined in a new article in Alaska Highway News.

The article mentions a UBC pilot program that offered Canadian accreditation to internationally trained midwives from 2008 to 2013.

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New book exhorts atheists to ‘come out’ of the closet
Religion News Service

More people should come out of the closet as atheists, says a San Francisco writer, in a new article by Religion News Service.

The article mentions a UBC study that found people had an overwhelming mistrust of atheists.

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Generation Squeezed
CBC The National

Canadians under the age of 40 today are facing a difficult time to reach major milestones in life, like getting a good job or buying a home, than previous generations, says UBC policy professor Paul Kershaw.

“Every year we spend around $45,000 per retiree on this country on really important things like medical care and old age security,” said Kershaw, founder of Generation Squeezed, an advocacy group for young people. “By contrast, we spend a fraction of that, around 12,000 dollars a year per younger person.”

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More details about the man accused of exploiting B.C. teen online
CBC The National

A man accused of exploiting Amanda Todd, a B.C. teenager who killed herself in 2012, has been arrested in the Netherlands.

According to UBC professor emeritus of computer science Richard Rosenberg, internet crimes can be difficult to prosecute.

“The fact that computer and the system it’s operating under are identified still leaves a lot of questions open about who actually did it,” Rosenberg said. “And unless he took pictures of himself and sent them over the net to her, how are you going to know?”

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Cheating said to be on rise in North American B-schools
Globe and Mail

Cheating runs rampant in business schools across North America, says a U.S. expert, in a new article in The Globe and Mail.

The article mentions a CBC survey on cheating at several Canadian universities. The survey found 36 students at UBC were caught cheating between 2011 and 2012.

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Bringing students into the grading process with new software
Globe and Mail

An online service that gets students more actively involved in the grading process is the focus of a new article in The Globe and Mail.

Called peerScholar, the tool provides peer evaluation of assignments, and is used by students at UBC.

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Smart cars an easy target for the not-so-smart
National Post

Flipping over Smart Cars is becoming a growing trend in San Francisco because it’s easy to do, according to a writer in The National Post.

The article mentions other car pranks, including the work of UBC engineers, who famously suspended a Volkswagen Beetle over the Golden Gate Bridge in 2001.

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What if we stopped loving hockey?
National Post

A new National Post article examines the impact of concussions on the future of hockey.

According to UBC Sauder School of Business professor James Brander, concussions could affect sponsorship.

“[Sponsors] want to be associated with things that have a positive buzz, not things that have a negative buzz,” he said.

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MacLeod was an inquisitive, quiet, fatherly figure
Globe and Mail

Canadian author Alistair MacLeod, who died at 77, is remembered in a new obituary in The Globe and Mail.

“It’s hard to believe that we’ll never again go to a reading and see Alistair there, that we will not hear his voice, that there will be no more stories,” writes Steve Galloway, acting chair of UBC’s creative writing program. “Peace to your soul, my friend. You were loved.”

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Harper’s tough choice on new fighter jet for Canada
Toronto Star

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is “caught between a rock and a hard place” when it comes to replacing Canada’s CF-18 fighter jets, says Michael Byers, Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law at UBC.

“[Harper] has left himself with just one option,” Byers writes. “He has to make a decision on replacing the CF-18s. And that, sadly, might lead to Canada buying the wrong plane.”

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Demystifying university admissions
Vancouver Sun

Myths about university admissions are debunked in a new Vancouver Sun op-ed by Kate Ross, associate vice-president and registrar, enrolment services, at UBC.

“Every Canadian university strives to serve their province’s and country’s students with fair and thorough admissions processes,” she writes.

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Canada lacks national autism strategy: UBC professor
Global BC

More needs to be done to tackle autism across Canada, says UBC education professor Pat Mirenda.

“Services and diagnostics remain very fragmented province to province, such that if a family literally moves from one province to another, they are in a whole new service delivery system. It is very fragmented, and it makes it very difficult for families,” she said.

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Malaria’s huge human cost
Vancouver Sun

The fight against malaria is the focus of a new article in The Vancouver Sun.

According to UBC School of Population and Public Health professor Rosemin Kassam, malaria can leave infected children with paralysis, brain damage and anemia.

UBC’s Neglected Global Diseases Institute is working to control the disease.

“The range of work on our campus alone is exciting,” said Kishor Wasan, dean of pharmacy research. “It’s all the way from drug discovery and development, to implementation and understanding the barriers to getting a product from a bench in the lab to the patient on the ground.”

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‘If we know what to do, why are they dying?’
Vancouver Sun

The high cost of malaria medication and vaccines is discussed in a new article in The Vancouver Sun.

“If you have to do multiple synthetic steps to put together a molecule, it requires a bunch of PhDs, and laboratories that have safety standards, and chemicals that have to be approved,” said UBC chemistry and pharmaceutical science professor Chris Orvig. “So it’s inherently expensive.”

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As TV turns 75, is best to come?
Province

A UBC English professor talks about the state of television, ahead of the 75th anniversary of its birth on April 30.

“We once thought television was dumb, but television has moved out of the dumb and dangerous zone,” said Tiffany Potter.

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Save your life, not just some time
Province

City streets need to be made safer for cyclists and pedestrians, says UBC engineering professor Gord Lovegrove, as jaywalking tickets increase in Surrey.

“Pedestrian and cyclist safety begins with the layout of a city,” he said.

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Seriously stressed-out students on the rise
Province

Student stress is the focus of a new article in The Province.

Two resources at UBC, the collegium and peer academic coaches, are mentioned.

“We’re helping students to develop more of what has been called a ‘growth mindset,’” said student development officer Patty Hambler. “Inevitably, there will be times when you stumble or fail. The idea is to learn to get back up again and do things differently the next time.”

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Are climate claims for burning renewable trees a smokescreen?
Tyee

The mission of UBC’s Bioenergy Research and Demonstration Facility to use renewable wood to generate electricity is questioned in a new report by The Tyee.

The facility is said to “reduce UBC’s natural gas consumption by 12 per cent and campus greenhouse gas emissions by nine per cent (5,000 tonnes), the equivalent of taking 1,000 cars off the road.”

“It’s very exciting,” said Brent Sauder, UBC’s director of strategic partnerships. “It’s not a research activity — it’s a mission.”

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A global focus on safety and security
Kelowna Daily Courier

A former British diplomat and his security company are partnering with UBC Okanagan to build a new research facility.

Plans for the facility include research on survivability technologies, like tracking, communications and ballistic protection.

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Event Highlight

Special Fireside Chat with Snxakila (Clyde Tallio)

Time: Wed Apr 23 2014, 7:30 PM - 9 PM

Location: St. John's College

Find out what else is happening at UBC: www.events.ubc.ca


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