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IPSOS-REID / UBC POLL RESULTS
GLOBAL SECURITY

As you know, since the terrorist bombings of September 11th, 2001, the Canadian government has undertaken a number of initiatives to ensure greater security for Canadians. Based on how you feel right now, when you think about your own personal security, would you say you generally feel secure or not secure?

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Very Secure

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Somewhat Secure

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Not Very Secure

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Not At All Secure

Do you agree or disagree with the following statements about security issues?

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Agree

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Disagree

Security Issues

1. I am prepared to accept the inconvenience of delays and longer line-ups at airports and borders, if it means I feel more secure when I’m traveling

2. Poverty and injustice are the major roots of hostility towards the United States and other developed nations

3. I am prepared to accept some limits to my civil liberties if it means I feel safer and more secure in my daily life

- GLOBAL SECURITY

MILESTONES

Liu Centre launches Centre for Human Security, headed by former United Nations executive Andrew Mack.

UBC responds to more than 100 media requests for expert commentary following the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Law students win mock NATO competition in Washington DC for third year in a row.

Gyuto monks from Tibet spend week at UBC promoting global spirituality as a solution to personal and world insecurity.

Global poll conducted by Liu Centre’s Angus Reid shows that criminal violence, not terrorism, is the greater concern in daily life.

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GLOBAL SECURITY

The events of September 11, 2001 changed the way most Canadians feel about their world, and about their own safety. But the lasting feelings of insecurity have grown beyond fear of terrorist tactics. Personal security has also been threatened - from fluctuating stock markets to job loss as the economy stumbled in the wake of the attacks.

UBC believes the best way to address security issues is to confront them through dialogue. From there governments and individuals alike can make informed decisions and take steps toward feeling safe on a personal, national and global scale.

 

HOW CAN AIRPORTS BE MORE SECURE WITHOUT SACRIFICING CONVENIENCE?

"We helped the Vancouver airport to find a way to improve their security without leaving people frustrated in line-ups all the time."

Mehmet Begen, Graduate student and research associate, Centre for Operations Excellence
Mehmet Begen, Graduate
student and research
associate, Centre for
Operations Excellence

MEHMET BEGEN After September 11, security rules for airports changed dramatically and colossal line-ups became common in airports across North America. Vancouver International Airport Authority (YVR) called upon UBC’s Centre for Operations Excellence to help.

“We analyzed their processes and built a visual computer simulation model,” says Mehmet Begen, who was initially a graduate student with the Centre, and is now employed as a Research Associate. “We identified bottlenecks and determined optimal staffing levels for desired customer service.” The team tested over 100 scenarios by repeatedly changing variables and examining the effects. “For example, if you double the staff, how much will waiting times decrease? With the computer you can figure it out very quickly.”

The ultimate goal is to extend the study and develop staff schedules for all airport gates. Begen believes their work will make YVR - and hopefully other airports - safer. “If we can schedule the staff better, they will not be as pressured by long queues of people. Increasing the system’s efficiency will also make it more effective.”

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GLOBAL SECURITY cont. >>

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